Houseshare fibs: The lies people tell their housemates

Looking for a place to live is usually a stressful experience, especially when you’re trying to find a houseshare with great people – you want them to like you, you want to like them and the house needs to tick a few boxes too. With this kind of pressure, often combined with a looming move date, we wouldn’t judge you if you told the odd white lie to help you secure your dream houseshare.

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We asked SpareRoom users what lies they’ve told their housemates. The most common fibs were about house clutter:

29% of housemates lie about being neat and tidy

28% say their easy going when it comes to clutter when really they aren’t

Some sneaky housemates lie about house etiquette, denying habits like hogging the bathroom or leaving dirty dishes lying around. Beware of the housemate who ‘never take long showers in the morning’ – 11% have lied about this – and watch out for the 11% who claim is wasn’t them who finished the last of the milk.

The sociable housemates tell the odd lie about being party animals with 10% saying they’re considerate when coming home from the pub and 5% saying they never have house parties despite the house being known locally as the go-to after party venue.

Our advice to anyone looking for new housemates is to be yourselves – you’ll have more luck finding like-minded people to live with if you’re open and honest about your lifestyle and hobbies. After all, home is a place you go to relax and be yourself, not the person your housemates want you to be.

What tall stories have you told to secure a flatshare or encourage a potential housemate to move in with you? Was it worth it or did you end up trying to be someone you’re not?

World’s biggest houseshare is forming in London

Some of us live on our own, some have family to share with and some live with friends. Some, however, find themselves in a position where they can’t have a house to themselves and don’t have enough friends to share with so they have to seek new housemates – often people they wouldn’t have chosen to share with otherwise. Enter David Cameron, desperate to fill the House of Commons with enough new friends to be able to take charge.

OK, that’s a fairly glib intro but the point is this – for the UK to have a stable and secure government over the next four years the main political parties will have to learn to work together and decide on some house rules. If not, we could see a long period of squabbling over whose turn it is to buy the toilet roll with very little real governing being done.

As with any form of share the parties will have to carve out a balance between themselves and strange and unexpected alliances may start to form. Suddenly, the calm, quiet person in the middle of the argument who isn’t fighting either extreme becomes hugely important as a mediator and is in a position of power over the other two who want to secure their support. Step forward Nick Clegg. If the Lib Dems play their cards right they could secure the electoral reform they’ve been seeking for years, setting themselves up well for the next election. Last night may have been a disappointment for them but it may just prove to be the stepping stone to the 3 party race they want to see in future .

With many existing house shares that involve new housemates moving in there’s a danger of the biggest room going to whoever was there first – step forward (or step down) Gordon Brown. It’ll be interesting to see how the Prime Minister (he is still PM for now) approaches the situation and what he’s prepared to give away to the Lib Dems in order to try and hang onto power. If he’s forced to step down then the others (and the rest of us) could find themselves with a new housemate nobody chose to live with, let alone be governed by.

Whatever happens over the next days and weeks let’s hope the country emerges with a government ready to steer us out of financial difficulty and address the serious problems faced by the housing market in the UK. With a serious shortage of housing something needs to happen to help homeowners who want to rent out a room and clear up the confusion surrounding the HMO situation for landlords (although I think a house with 650 in it is an HMO in anyone’s book).

At least if they’re all sharing it’ll cut down on expenses.

Matt